ScienceSmart contact lens could monitor glaucoma and give drugs...

Smart contact lens could monitor glaucoma and give drugs when needed


A wireless contact lens that monitors eye pressure and delivers glaucoma drugs on demand has been tested in animals



Health



17 May 2022

Glaucoma

A view of the retina of an eye with glaucoma

PAUL PARKER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

A wireless contact lens device could help to treat the eye disease glaucoma by monitoring the build-up of pressure inside the eye and automatically delivering drugs when it rises too high.

Glaucoma affects about 7.7 million people worldwide and is caused by insufficient drainage of fluid from the eye, which elevates eye pressure and can damage the optic nerve that transmits visual signals to the brain.

The disease is commonly treated using drugs that help to drain excess fluid from the eye, in the form of eye drops. But people may fail to stick to their treatment schedule, according to Xi Xie at Sun Yat-Sen University in Guangzhou, China and his colleagues.

They designed a prototype contact lens device that can sense eye pressure and release glaucoma drugs when needed. The outer layer of the lens has six tiny copper plates arranged in a ring around the pupil that sense eye deformation caused by a rise in eye pressure. An antenna placed near the eye then transmits the data to a nearby computer. The inner layer of the lens – in contact with the cornea region of the eye – is loaded with a pressure-lowering drug called brimonidine that can be released when the lens receives a signal from the computer via the antenna.

The researchers have trialled their lenses in healthy rabbits. They first demonstrated that the device could monitor eye pressure in the animals, and transmit the data wirelessly to the external computer. They then used the computer to wirelessly transmit a signal to the contact lens that triggered the release of brimonidine.

By then tracking changes in eye pressure in the rabbits, they found that the animals’ eye pressure had decreased by around a third after 30 minutes, and by more than 40 per cent after 2 hours, on average.

“The realisation of this technology for use at point-of-care settings could revolutionise the lives of millions of patients with glaucoma,” says Ali Yetisen at Imperial College London. “It [would be] a wonderful addition to the [tools] of the ophthalmologist.”

However, further studies will be needed to assess how well the device works in humans.

Journal reference: Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-29860-x

 

 

 

 

More on these topics:



Original Source Link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest News

Bill Ackman says U.S. economy risks a ‘train wreck’

Hedge fund billionaire Bill Ackman says the U.S. economy risks heading for a “train wreck,” following Wednesday’s interest...

Chainalysis breaks down how scammers adapt during the bear market

While scammers can also feel the chill of the crypto winter as scam revenue drops by 46%, some...

FirstFT: SoftBank’s Arm to raise prices ahead of New York IPO

Good morning. This article is an on-site version of our FirstFT newsletter. Sign up to our Asia, Europe/Africa...

Canva introduces new AI-powered design tools in a major update

Web-based design platform Canva is introducing a colossal suite of new brand management products and AI-powered design tools...

Adragos Pharma acquires Clinigen’s development unit, Lamda Laboratories

Acquisition strengthens Adragos end-to-end integrated service offering within the pharmaceutical product development segment Agreement includes further product development activities...

Disaster For Trump As Appeals Court Rules His Own Lawyer Must Testify Against Him

A federal appeals court has ruled that Trump lawyer Evan Corcoran must testify against the former president in...

Must Read

- Advertisement -

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you