WorldThe Largest Freshwater Fish Ever Is Caught In Cambodia

The Largest Freshwater Fish Ever Is Caught In Cambodia


The world’s largest recorded freshwater fish, a giant stingray, has been caught in the Mekong River in Cambodia, according to scientists from the Southeast Asian nation and the United States. (See images below.)

The stingray, captured on June 13, measured almost four meters (13 feet) from snout to tail and weighed slightly under 300 kilograms (660 pounds), according to a statement Monday by Wonders of the Mekong, a joint Cambodian-U.S. research project.

The previous record for a freshwater fish was a 293-kilogram (646-pound) Mekong giant catfish, discovered in Thailand in 2005, the group said. The stingray was snagged by a local fisherman south of Stung Treng in northeastern Cambodia.

Village residents watch as researchers release a record-breaking giant freshwater stingray back into the Mekong River.
Village residents watch as researchers release a record-breaking giant freshwater stingray back into the Mekong River.

The stingray was snagged by a local fisherman south of Stung Treng in northeastern Cambodia. The fisherman, who earned $600 for the catch, alerted a nearby team of scientists from the Wonders of the Mekong project, which has publicized its conservation work in communities along the river.

The stingray weighed about 660 pounds.
The stingray weighed about 660 pounds.

“When you see a fish this size, especially in freshwater, it is hard to comprehend, so I think all of our team was stunned,” Wonders of the Mekong leader Zeb Hogan said in an online interview from the University of Nevada in Reno. The university is partnering with the Cambodian Fisheries Administration and USAID, the U.S. government’s international development agency.

Researchers say the catch was a hopeful sign for the Mekong River in the face of environmental challenges.
Researchers say the catch was a hopeful sign for the Mekong River in the face of environmental challenges.

Freshwater fish are defined as those that spend their entire lives in freshwater, as opposed to giant marine species such as bluefin tuna and marlin, or fish that migrate between fresh and saltwater like the huge beluga sturgeon.

The team that rushed to the site inserted a tagging device near the tail of the mighty fish before releasing it. The device will send tracking information for the next year, providing unprecedented data on giant stingray behavior in Cambodia.

“The fact that the fish can still get this big is a hopeful sign for the Mekong River, ” Hogan said, noting that the waterway faces many environmental challenges.





Original Source Link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest News

Oath Keepers Charged With Seditious Conspiracy To Use Dangerous Defense

The single most significant January 6th case to date is now being tried in front of a Washington...

Mr.C-Branded Residences Come To The Dubai Waterfront

Spring boarding off the success of the first Mr.C-branded residences built next to the family’s flagship hotel in...

Kylie Jenner Rocks Bleached Eyebrows While Eating Grapes In Bikini Top – Hollywood Life

View gallery Kylie Jenner, 25, looked almost unrecognizable in her latest set of social media photos. The makeup mogul...

Must Read

Love Is Blind’s Danielle Ruhl Reveals How Divorce With Nick Thompson Came To Be!

Danielle Ruhl is opening up about her breakup...

‘Grotesquely overpriced’ — Apple’s App Store wants 30% cut on NFT sales

Non-fungible token (NFT) app developers and others have...
- Advertisement -

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you