WorldIreland, Norway, Spain, recognize Palestinian statehood : NPR

Ireland, Norway, Spain, recognize Palestinian statehood : NPR


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Today’s top stories

The leaders of Ireland, Norway and Spain have announced their countries would officially recognize Palestinian statehood on May 28. Simon Harris, the taoiseach, or prime minister of Ireland, said he was confident other countries would join him. In Norway, Prime Minister Jonas Gahr Støre insisted that without the recognition of Palestinian statehood, “there cannot be peace in the Middle East.” Israel’s foreign minister, Israel Katz, said he would recall the country’s ambassadors from the three states. More than 100 United Nations member states recognize a Palestinian state. The U.S. and many European countries do not.

Ireland’s Prime Minister Simon Harris, left, flanked by Ireland’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Micheál Martin, speaks Wednesday in Dublin to announce Ireland’s recognition of a Palestinian state.

PAUL FAITH/AFP via Getty Images


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PAUL FAITH/AFP via Getty Images


Ireland’s Prime Minister Simon Harris, left, flanked by Ireland’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Micheál Martin, speaks Wednesday in Dublin to announce Ireland’s recognition of a Palestinian state.

PAUL FAITH/AFP via Getty Images

  • Not much will change in Spain, which already has open channels of communication with the Palestinian Authority, NPR freelance reporter Miguel Macias reports. “We could say that it’s mostly a symbolic move.” But with more countries making this move, Palestinians could have more leverage when it comes to a possible peace agreement.

Lawyers for former President Donald Trump and two co-defendants are in a Florida court today to ask a federal judge to dismiss charges against their clients. Trump is charged with taking classified material with him to his Mar-a-Lago home and then taking part in a conspiracy to hide documents from federal investigators. The former president’s lawyers say he’s a victim of “selective and vindictive” prosecution, and the case is a “personal and political attack” against him. Earlier this month, a federal judge delayed the start of the trial indefinitely.

  • The case is unlikely to start until the fall at the earliest, NPR’s Greg Allen says. Lawyers for Trump and the co-defendants have filed a slew of motions, including today’s, that contain references to sensitive information prosecutors don’t want to make public before the trial. The confidential nature of the documents is another complication, as the jury won’t have clearance to see them

Ascension, one of the largest health care systems in the country, is still dealing with the consequences of a ransomware attack two weeks ago. Hospital staff can’t access electronic records, and the system’s pharmacies were also hit hard, making it difficult for patients to get their medications. Health care systems have become increasingly appealing targets for cyber attacks because of the amount of sensitive data they hold on patients and how well-funded they are.

  • “There are delays at every step,” Olivia Aldridge of NPR network station KUT in Austin says. Staff have to do everything by hand, including writing down orders for medication, imaging, and labs, which have to be delivered on foot to other departments. Ascension is working with several cybersecurity firms and federal agencies, including the FBI, in an ongoing investigation.

Deep dive

A Singapore Airlines plane flies after take off from Changi Airport in Singapore on Feb. 20. A Singapore Airlines flight from London to Singapore was diverted after it encountered severe turbulence.

ROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP via Getty Images


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ROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP via Getty Images


A Singapore Airlines plane flies after take off from Changi Airport in Singapore on Feb. 20. A Singapore Airlines flight from London to Singapore was diverted after it encountered severe turbulence.

ROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP via Getty Images

One man died, and 30 people were injured yesterday after a Singapore Airlines flight hit severe turbulence. The deceased passenger possibly had a heart attack, the general manager of Bangkok’s Suvarnabhumi Airport told reporters. Turbulence is usually a minor inconvenience — but it can vary in severity. Here’s why it happens and how you can keep yourself safe.

  • Turbulence is irregular air movement that causes erratic changes in the altitude or angle of the plane. Passengers may sense bumpiness, choppiness or tossing.
  • Atmospheric pressure, the air around mountains, weather fronts or storms, and jet streams can all cause turbulence.
  • Clear air turbulence is one of the most dangerous kinds because it gives no visible warning and can occur before pilots have time to turn the fasten seatbelt sign on.
  • Injuries due to turbulence are rare. Most passengers who are seriously injured weren’t wearing their seatbelts, according to a 2021 National Transportation Safety Board Report.

Today, there’s 55% more severe turbulence on flights than in the 70s, according to Paul Williams, a professor of atmospheric science at the University of Reading. On Morning Edition, he explains why this is partly due to climate change.

The science of siblings

Eddie Almance (left) and his sister Leila pose for their cousin Ailem Villarreal on the rooftop of the Marriott Hotel in downtown Odessa, Texas, before heading to prom. Their grandmother says that for seven generations, the family members have forged close bonds.

Danielle Villasana for NPR


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Danielle Villasana for NPR


Eddie Almance (left) and his sister Leila pose for their cousin Ailem Villarreal on the rooftop of the Marriott Hotel in downtown Odessa, Texas, before heading to prom. Their grandmother says that for seven generations, the family members have forged close bonds.

Danielle Villasana for NPR

The Science of Siblings is a new series from NPR exploring the ways our siblings can influence us, from our money and our mental health all the way down to our very molecules.

Many people count their siblings among their best friends. The Science of Siblings team asked NPR readers to share personal stories about their sibling relationships and received more than 100 responses. Some recounted the strength of their bond from the beginning. Others detailed how their connections strengthened and evolved over time. From uniting over health crises to keeping in touch through group chats, readers shared their secrets to close sibling bonds.

3 things to know before you go

Harlan Gough holds a recently collected tiger beetle on a tether.

Lawrence Reeves


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Lawrence Reeves


Harlan Gough holds a recently collected tiger beetle on a tether.

Lawrence Reeves

  1. For many insects, flying at night is a matter of life or death, as hungry bats use their echolocation to search for food. New research reveals that tiger beetles produce their own ultrasound to trick bats into thinking they’re toxic.
  2. Patricia Nieshoff found herself alone at the hospital in September of 2006 after her son had a grand mal seizure. With no family nearby, she was scared until a neighbor and unsung hero showed up to support her.
  3. New research found microplastics can build up in the testicles of humans and dogs — adding a new meaning to “plastic junk.” 

This newsletter was edited by Majd Al-Waheidi.



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